Helen's Garden Renovation Project

Friday 16 October 2009

Raspberry frame destruction

Filed under: Greenhouse,Progress — Helen @ 2:47 pm

I have finished the staining of the wooden shelving in the greenhouse and have screwed the shelves back in place. It was very difficult to get them back in. I had taken the precaution of photographing the shelves in their original positions so I knew which shelf went where (by comparing the positions of the knots in the wood), but it still required considerable brute force to push them into place. I tried to put the screws back into their original holes but this was difficult too. This is what the end result looks like, and I think it was probably worth it.

The greenhouse staging, stained in Sadolin teak woodstain

The greenhouse staging, stained in Sadolin teak woodstain

It is definitely autumn now, and that means loads of mushrooms. The following specimen is growing in abundance in one of our communal landscaped areas.

Fungus growing in communal area under lime tree

Fungus growing in communal area under lime tree

I am hoping that it is not honey fungus. I looked up honey fungus on the Internet and it is supposed to be apparent under the bark of the tree, which it isn’t. So maybe it is just some pretty brown stuff.

My tomatoes are still going happily and not suffering from blight, thanks to my copper fungicide. I am also pleased to report that my blackberry, which flowered wrongly last month, is now wrongly sporting a cluster of green fruits.

Unblighted tomato plant

Unblighted tomato plant

Now that I have finished staining the staging, I can do some fun stuff, like demolishing the raspberry frame. This edifice was put up in June 1996 by a working party led by my dad. Since he had to mix the concrete by hand, we were economical with it, and dug nice neat holes with plenty of rubble in them. As a result, I found that after digging to a depth of about six inches around one of the posts, I could easily push it over. Indeed, a six-foot man could probably push the posts over without needing to dig any of the soil out first. However, this is not a disparaging comment on its construction (my parents never read this blog, but someone else might read it and tell them), since the frame has stood firm in many bouts of strong winds for more than thirteen years. I am just glad that this is going to be an easy job.

The remains of the raspberry frame after the start of demolition

The remains of the raspberry frame after the start of demolition

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